ADHD drugs ‘do not stunt children’s growth,’ say AAP

September 1, 2014 by  
Filed under Featured, Research

Medical News Today reports:

To investigate whether stimulant medications are associated with final adult height, the researchers examined 340 children with ADHD who were born between 1976-1982 and compared their final height in adulthood with a control group of 680 children who did not have the disorder.

After studying height and stimulant treatment information from medical records and an adult follow-up study, the team found that neither ADHD nor stimulant treatment was associated with final height in adulthood.

Read more about the study on Medical News Today.

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Bipolar Disorder Genes Uncovered

September 1, 2014 by  
Filed under Research

Jane Collingwood reports on a new study:

… Professor Markus Nothen of the University of Bonn, Germany, explains, “There is no one gene that has a significant effect on the development of bipolar disorder. Many different genes are evidently involved and these genes work together with environmental factors in a complex way.”

His international team analyzed genetic information from 2,266 patients with bipolar disorder and 5,028 comparable people without bipolar disorder. They merged these individuals’ information with that of thousands of others held in previous databases. Altogether, this included the genetic material of 9,747 patients and 14,278 non-patients. The researchers analyzed about 2.3 million different regions of DNA.

This highlighted five areas that appeared to be connected to bipolar disorder. Two of these were new gene regions containing “candidate genes” connected to bipolar disorder, specifically the gene “ADCY2″ on chromosome five and the so-called “MIR2113-POU3F2″ region on chromosome six.

Read more on PsychCentral.

Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome and Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Prevalence, Associations, and Explanation of the Relationships

August 29, 2014 by  
Filed under Research

A new study by Robertson, Cavanna, and Eapen has been published in the Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences: “Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome and Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Prevalence, Associations, and Explanation of the Relationships.”

Note that there is no difference between “Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome” (the original name for the syndrome and “Tourette’s syndrome” or “Tourette’s Disorder” or any of the other variations:

Abstract

Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and conduct disorder (CD) are both heterogeneous childhood onset conditions, and although patients with CD have been described in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome cohorts, little is known about the etiology of CD in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome or of the interrelationships.

A cohort of 578 consecutive patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome was assessed using standard assessment protocols.

A total of 13.5% of participants had only Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, whereas the rest had associated comorbidities and psychopathology. CD occurred in 14.5% of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome probands.

These findings suggest that CD is not an integral part of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome but rather that CD in the context of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is related to the presence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as, and importantly, a family history of aggressive and violent behavior and forensic encounters.

Resource: Tic Management 101 for Parents: A CBIT Perspective

August 29, 2014 by  
Filed under Event, Featured, Tips

Douglas W. Woods, Ph.D. recently presented a webinar  for parents on CBIT (Comprehensive Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics).

If you missed it, you can watch it on TSA’s website and view/download the slides he used in the presentation..

Healthcare professionals may want to view an earlier presentation oriented to professionals.

Genetic Predisposition Increases the Tic Severity, Rate of Comorbidities, and Psychosocial and Educational Difficulties in Children With Tourette Syndrome

August 29, 2014 by  
Filed under Featured, Research

A new study in the Journal of Child Neurology by Eysturoy, Skov, and Debes may be of interest to some readers.

“Genetic Predisposition Increases the Tic Severity, Rate of Comorbidities, and Psychosocial and Educational Difficulties in Children With Tourette Syndrome.”

Abstract

This study aimed to examine whether there are differences in tic severity, comorbidities, and psychosocial and educational consequences in children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome compared with children with Tourette syndrome without genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome.

A total of 314 children diagnosed with Tourette syndrome participated in this study. Validated diagnostic tools were used to assess tic severity, comorbidities, and cognitive performance. A structured interview was used to evaluate psychosocial and educational consequences related to Tourette syndrome.

The children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition present with statistically significant differences in terms of severity of tics, comorbidities, and a range of psychosocial and educational factors compared with the children with Tourette syndrome without genetic predisposition.

Professionals need to be aware of genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome, as children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition have more severe symptoms than those children with Tourette syndrome who are without genetic predisposition.

Please keep in mind that research studies finding correlations or predictors do not guarantee that any one child (your child) will show the pattern found. But such studies are helpful in expanding our understanding of Tourette Syndrome and can also be of help if you are trying to figure out why your child’s symptoms or comorbidities may be severe. Although we will always look at environmental factors and other factors, too, understanding that your child may have come into the world genetically loaded to have more severe symptoms may help you.

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